New Mexico Department of Transportation Autodesk BIM solutions for the design and construction of transportation network

New Mexico Department of Transportation Autodesk BIM solutions for the design and construction of transportation network

NMDOT adopts Autodesk BIM solutions for the design and construction of its transportation network

Cambray Bridge designed by an intern, Matthew Oakley who had only spent a few hours on the Autodesk InfraWorks. In early 2013, the New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) continued down a path to 3D model-based design processes by adopting Autodesk® BIM solutions for the design and construction of its roads, highways and bridges. NMDOT’s strategic decision was prompted by a range of anticipated benefits, including cost savings due to reduced change orders, improved public input using model-based visualizations, and improved construction using BIM solutions to support virtual construction planning and sequencing.

While finishing projects started on its former design platform, NMDOT staff began training on Autodesk® AutoCAD® Civil 3D® and Autodesk® InfraWorks™ software, and the Department is now embarking on its full-scale deployment of these Autodesk solutions—using them for production on most new projects starting in 2014. Designers have already begun using Civil 3D on the design of two bridge replacement projects: Berrendo Creek Bridge in Roswell and two sets of bridges on Interstate 10 (I-10) in Las Cruces. “The original survey and preliminary design phase of these projects were carried out using our former design platform. We imported that preliminary design data into Civil 3D and are now using the software for the detailed design and documentation of these projects,” says Scott May, IT Application Developer, NMDOT. Water over the bridge in September 2013, multiple days of record rainfall in New Mexico led to widespread flooding of the rivers and creeks in Roswell, including the usually dry Berrendo Creek. Over four inches of rain caused the creek to flood, and water and debris to nearly overtopped a steel bridge on US 285 that spans the creek.

Built in 1963, the bridge was already in poor condition and had experienced a number of flooding events. In addition, the older structure does not meet today’s design standards and is not compliant with the 1990 American with Disabilities Act (ADA). As a result, NMDOT is replacing the bridge’s deck and steel girders, and rehabilitating the existing substructure. In addition, the new design will ensure that the bridge can withstand being overtopped by water, with debris collectors added to keep the driving lanes clear of obstructions and enable emergency personnel to use the bridge during flooding. The new girder and deck design will raise the bridge deck several inches and will provide pedestrian ADA sidewalks on both sides of the bridge.
Civil 3D provides significant time savings. Its model-based design approach speeds up everything from the creation of alignments and surfaces to volume and earthwork calculations. And since the design model is dynamically linked to the quantities and documentation, we save considerable time when making design changes.

Jessica Hunter | Project Development Engineer New Mexico Department of Transportation
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